java.util.Date Class

This class is used to handle Date and Time. This class gets the current system date and time. And also create Date object with the given date and time.

It allowed the interpretation of dates as year, month, day, hour, minute, and second values. It also allowed the formatting and parsing of date strings. Unfortunately, the API for these functions was not amenable to internationalization. As of JDK 1.1, the Calendar class should be used to convert between dates and time fields and the DateFormat class should be used to format and parse date strings. The corresponding methods in Date are deprecated.

In all methods of class Date that accept or return year, month, date, hours, minutes, and seconds values, the following representations are used:

  • A year y is represented by the integer y - 1900.
  • A month is represented by an integer from 0 to 11; 0 is January, 1 is February, and so forth; thus 11 is December.
  • A date (day of month) is represented by an integer from 1 to 31 in the usual manner.
  • An hour is represented by an integer from 0 to 23. Thus, the hour from midnight to 1 a.m. is hour 0, and the hour from noon to 1 p.m. is hour 12.
  • A minute is represented by an integer from 0 to 59 in the usual manner.
  • A second is represented by an integer from 0 to 61; the values 60 and 61 occur only for leap seconds and even then only in Java implementations that actually track leap seconds correctly. Because of the manner in which leap seconds are currently introduced, it is extremely unlikely that two leap seconds will occur in the same minute, but this specification follows the date and time conventions for ISO C.

This class has following constructors.

java.util.Date Constructors

Date()

Allocates a Date object and initializes it so that it represents the time at which it was allocated, measured to the nearest millisecond.

Date(int year, int month, int date)

Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by Calendar.set(year + 1900, month, date) or GregorianCalendar(year + 1900, month, date).

Date(int year, int month, int date, int hrs, int min)

Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by Calendar.set(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min) or GregorianCalendar(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min).

Date(int year, int month, int date, int hrs, int min, int sec)

Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by Calendar.set(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min, sec) or GregorianCalendar(year + 1900, month, date, hrs, min, sec).

Date(long date)

Allocates a Date object and initializes it to represent the specified number of milliseconds since the standard base time known as "the epoch", namely January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT.

Date(String s)

Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by DateFormat.parse(String s).

In this tutorial you can learn about java.util.Date class. And also learn how to use java.util.Date class.

java.util.Date Class Example
/* Save with file name UDateExample.java */

public class UDateExample
{
	public static void main(String args[])
	{
		//java.util.Date DECLARATION
		java.util.Date d;

		//java.util.Date OBJECT CREATION
		//USING DEFAULT CONSTRUCTOR
		d = new java.util.Date();

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println(d);

		//DAY OF MONTH
		System.out.println("Day of Month : " + d.getDate());

		//AS PER SPECIFICATIONS MONTH VALUE IS 0 TO 11
		//YOU SHOULD ADD +1 TO MONTH VALUE
		System.out.println("Month : " + (d.getMonth() + 1));

		//AS PER SPECIFICATIONS YEAR VALUE IS -1900
		//YOU SHOULD ADD +1900 TO YEAR VALUE
		System.out.println("Year : " + (d.getYear() + 1900));

		//HOURS
		System.out.println("Hours : " + d.getHours());

		//MINUTES
		System.out.println("Minutes : " + d.getMinutes());

		//SECONDS
		System.out.println("Seconds : " + d.getSeconds());
	}
}
                        
java.util.Date Class Example 2
/* Save with file name UDateExample2.java */

import java.util.Date;

public class UDateExample2
{
	public static void main(String args[])
	{
		//java.util.Date DECLARATION
		Date d;

		//java.util.Date OBJECT CREATION
		//USING DEFAULT CONSTRUCTOR
		d = new Date();

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println(d);

		//CHANGE THE DATE VLUES
		d.setDate(1);

		//MONTH 0 IS JANUARY
		d.setMonth(0);

		//SET YEAR
		d.setYear((d.getYear() + 1));

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT AFTER CHANGES
		System.out.println(d);
	}
}
                        
java.util.Date Class Example 3
/* Save with file name UDateExample3.java */

import java.util.*;

public class UDateExample3
{
	public static void main(String args[])
	{
		//java.util.Date DECLARATION
		Date d;

		//java.util.Date OBJECT CREATION
		//USING PARAMETER CONSTRUCTOR
		//Date(int year, int month, int date, int hrs, int min, int sec)
		//YEAR IS 2011 YOU SHOULD USE (2011-1900)
		d = new Date((2011-1900),11,1,10,20,30);

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println(d);

		//toGMTString
		System.out.println("toGMTString : " + d.toGMTString());

		//toLocaleString
		System.out.println("toLocaleString : " + d.toLocaleString());

		//toString
		System.out.println("toString : " + d.toString());
	}
}
                        
java.util.Date Class Example 4
/* Save with file name UDateExample4.java */

import java.util.*;

public class UDateExample4
{
	public static void main(String args[])
	{
		//java.util.Date DECLARATION
		Date d;

		//java.util.Date OBJECT CREATION
		//USING PARAMETER CONSTRUCTOR
		//Date(long date)
		d = new Date(System.currentTimeMillis());

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println(d);

		//java.util.Date OBJECT CREATION
		//USING PARAMETER CONSTRUCTOR
		//Date(String s) mm/dd/yyyy
		Date d2 = new Date("07/01/2011 10:20:15");

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println(d2);

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println("before : " + d2.before(d));

		//java.util.Date OUTPUT
		System.out.println("after : " + d2.after(d));
	}
}